Vermont Folklife Center - Digital Archive

Springfield Mountain (OT2003-3014-006)



[Singing starts at 0:16]

On Springfield Mountain there did dwell
A pretty youth I knew full well
'Twas elder Merritt's only son
A phantom youth near twenty one

On Monday morning he did go
Into the meadow for to mow
He had not mowed quite round the field
When a poison serpent bit his heel

For he recovered received to see his fatal wound
He dropped his scythe upon the ground
And straight for home was his intent
He cried alound all as he went

His friends around him all did hear
And none of them to him came near
Thinking he did some unknown call
He quite quite alone was doom did fall

He laid him down composed to rest
And crossed his arms upon his breast
His mouth and eyes were closen fast
And time and thus poor lad he slept at last

As as dark and darksome night was coming on
The father went to see his son
And then his dearest boy was found
Dead as a stone upon the ground

No consolation did he did he did

Not consolation did her him leave
That angels might his soul receive
He could but know that he was gone
His hopes and pride his only son

References:
  • "The only son," typewritten Atwood family lyrics owned by Margaret MacArthur, archived at the Vermont Folklife Center.
  • Tristam Coffin. In A Good Tale and a Bonnie Tune. Dallas, Texas: Southern Methodist University Press. 1964. p. 202-3.
  • "The Springfield Ballad". The Middlebury Register (Middlebury, Vermont). May 30, 1855. p. 1.

Dublin Core

Title

Springfield Mountain (OT2003-3014-006)

Alternative Title

The Only Son

Description

Song excerpted from audio recording OT2003-3014, part of VFC2003-0007 Margaret MacArthur Collection.

Creator

Source

Margaret MacArthur Collection -- VFC2003-0007. Vermont Folklife Center Archive, Vermont Folklife Center, Middlebury, Vermont, United States of America.

Date Created

1964-07-17

Contributor

Language

en

Identifier

VFC2003-0007 OT2003-3014-006

Rights Holder

Vermont Folklife Center

Song Item Type Metadata

Local Title

The Only Son

Standard Title

Springfield Mountain

Standard Title Reference

Folk Music Index (http://www.ibiblio.org/folkindex)
Laws, Malcolm. Native American Balladry: A Descriptive Study and a Bibliographical Syllabus. American Folklore Society (Philadelphia, 1950). 213-4.

Transcription

[Singing starts at 0:16]

On Springfield Mountain there did dwell
A pretty youth I knew full well
'Twas elder Merritt's only son
A phantom youth near twenty one

On Monday morning he did go
Into the meadow for to mow
He had not mowed quite round the field
When a poison serpent bit his heel

For he recovered received to see his fatal wound
He dropped his scythe upon the ground
And straight for home was his intent
He cried alound all as he went

His friends around him all did hear
And none of them to him came near
Thinking he did some unknown call
He quite quite alone was doom did fall

He laid him down composed to rest
And crossed his arms upon his breast
His mouth and eyes were closen fast
And time and thus poor lad he slept at last

As as dark and darksome night was coming on
The father went to see his son
And then his dearest boy was found
Dead as a stone upon the ground

No consolation did he did he did

Not consolation did her him leave
That angels might his soul receive
He could but know that he was gone
His hopes and pride his only son

References:
  • "The only son," typewritten Atwood family lyrics owned by Margaret MacArthur, archived at the Vermont Folklife Center.
  • Tristam Coffin. In A Good Tale and a Bonnie Tune. Dallas, Texas: Southern Methodist University Press. 1964. p. 202-3.
  • "The Springfield Ballad". The Middlebury Register (Middlebury, Vermont). May 30, 1855. p. 1.

Duration

2:30

Citation

Atwood, Fred, “Springfield Mountain (OT2003-3014-006),” Vermont Folklife Center Digital Collections, accessed June 29, 2022, http://explore.vermontfolklifecenter.org/digital-archive/collections/items/show/1193.